This house would create a national lottery

A lottery is a form of gambling whereby lots are drawn and, depending on selections, prizes handed out. Many countries have lotteries which raise revenues for various levels of government as well as often providing a charitable donation to numerous worthy causes. The lotteries are usually monopolies granted by the government to private companies who take a slice of the profits and turn the rest over to the state. Income from state lotteries is often devoted to special categories of spending, partly in order to make playing the game more attractive to the public; in the USA states often use lottery funds for education, in Britain they are pledged to areas such as sport, the arts and charities. Most lotteries involve tickets purchased from local vendors, these may be pre-printed with digits or carry a selection of numbers chosen by the purchaser. Draws are usually made on national television with a frequency which varies from country to country, but in almost every case huge media and advertising attention surrounds the event. Proponents argue that lotteries provide unique, life-changing opportunities for winners whilst providing a source of revenue separate from traditional, antagonistic direct tax methods. Opponents maintain that national lotteries only serve to encourage and foster addictions to gambling and that it is an implicit taxation that in fact only works in favour of the already-wealthy.

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